Tag Archives: tribute

Letters to Lauren Faust

Dear Lauren,

It’s been three months since I first watched an episode of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, but I still remember that day clearly.  A chain reaction started on that unassuming Saturday afternoon, one that has created more laughs, smiles, and fond memories than I ever expected, and it’s all because you fell in love with an idea and dedicated yourself to making it a reality.  Today, as I watched the season finale, I thought back on all of those memories and realized that without you, none of them would have even been possible, and I knew that I had to thank you somehow.  That’s why I wrote this letter: to let you in on a few of the best memories I’ve made thanks to your ponies, and to let you know how grateful I am for your part in making them.

So thank you.  Thank you for essentially introducing me to one of my best friends, Tek, whom I met through the comments section of my first pony-related post way back in February.  Thank you for the smile that I wore as I drew a picture of Pinkie Pie to send to my fifteen-year-old sister, whose cheerful spirit reminds me a lot of everyone’s favorite party pony, and thank you for the even bigger smile that I got when she wrote me back saying “I decided I’m officially Pinkie Pie!  Speaking of ponies, would you draw me a picture of Fluttershy?  Please?”.  Thank you for the chance to watch the show with her and my sixteen-year-old brother, and for all the fun we’ve had quoting it back and forth to each other since.  Thank you for the unexpected fun of watching one of my college friends succumb to the charm of the ponies, and for how it’s given us a great excuse to hang out every Thursday afternoon to watch a few episodes and chat.  Thanks, too, for the great laugh I got when a friend who posted “What’s up with the ponies?” on my Facebook wall in early April posted “I want a pet alligator named Gummy” just a few weeks later.

Perhaps most of all, however, I thank you for giving thousands and thousands of other people all around the world the same kind of lasting memories that you’ve given me.  You’ve really done something wonderful, Lauren, something that’s touched people from every walk of life, and there’s no way that all of us could say a thank you big enough or sincere enough to express our gratitude.  Still, we had to try, so I opened up my email to the bronies of Ponychan, PonyGAF, and Equestria Daily, people who also owe a lot of great memories to you, to send you their own letters of gratitude for all that you have done.  You can find their letters below, letters with stories of love found, hope restored, and lives changed.  I know there are a lot of them and that you’re a very busy woman, but I hope that you’ll take the time to scroll through, read some of these letters, see what your work has meant to all of us, and take pride in what you’ve accomplished.  You deserve it.

Sincerely,

Tim N.

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Song of the Week: “I’da Called You Woody Joe” by The Gaslight Anthem

Some songs enthrall us because of their artistic and original music, and we love others for their evocative and memorable lyrics.  Then there are the songs that capture our hearts with the inspiring stories behind them, the tributes and the love songs.  “I’da Called You Woody, Joe” is one of those songs.  At first glance, it seems like a bizarre, cryptic tune, upbeat and catchy but nonetheless utterly pointless.  The real depth and beauty of this song, however, comes from its history.  It’s a tribute from Brian Fallon, the lead singer of The Gaslight Anthem, to a man named Joe Strummer, the lead guitarist of a band called The Clash.  Rico, the man mentioned at the beginning of the song, owned a record store when Brian was young.  He bought one of The Clash’s albums for Brian, claiming that the music would change his life.  Rico was right, and Joe Strummer’s work grew into a huge influence on Brian’s own songwriting and even his life in general.  Many, many of the phrases used in “I’da Called You Woody, Joe” are direct quotes from songs by The Clash, and even the title is a reference to how Joe used to call himself Woody because Woody Guthrie left such an impression on him.  To Brian, Joe was his Woody, his inspiration, his hero.

Joe died in 2002, and as he writes in the song, Brian “never got to tell him, so I just wrote it down” as a letter to Joe’s wife, Lucinda, to let her know how much Joe meant to him.  You can practically feel his gratitude and admiration flowing through the notes and the lines of the piece.  When I read this story, I was impressed by the effort that Brian put forth to express his love for his childhood hero.  The end result is pleasant, memorable, nostalgic, and moving, and it made me think: How many of us would go to such great lengths to show someone whom we admire, someone who changed our lives for the better, how much we appreciate them?  How often do we take the men and women who drive us to become more for granted?  And how many times have we sung out to God our love and gratitude for His immeasurably marvelous influence on our lives?  May we take a cue from Brian Fallon and seek to edify the “Woodys” in our lives with a heartfelt, genuine show of appreciation.

Here is the link: I’da Called You Woody, Joe

And here are the lyrics: 

I was crawling around in my head in the haze of a trance.
Rico said, “I’ma turn you onto a sound, cool out your head. This is the sound from Camden town,”

And then I heard it like a shot through my skull to my brain,
I felt my fingertips tingle, and it started to rain,
When the walls of my bedroom were tremblin’ around me,
This ramshackle voice over attack of a bluesbeat,
Tellin’ me, he’s only looking for fun.
And this was the sound, of the very last gang in town.

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I’m doing all right,
Are you doing all right?

And I carried these songs as a comfort wherever I’d go.
They was there when my summers was high,
There when she left me alone.
Saying, “The soul is hard to find.”

And I never got to tell him, so I just wrote it down.
I wrapped a couple chords around it and I let it come out,
When the walls of my bedroom were tremblin’ around me,
This ramshackle voice over attack of a bluesbeat,
And a girl, on the excitement gang.
And this was the sound, of the very last gang in town.

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And are you doing all right?
Are you doing all right?

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And are you doing all right?

And that was the sound,
I hear the sound,
Do you hear the sound?
I hear the sound,
Of the very last gang in town.


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