Tag Archives: hero

Pathos: Robert Wallace

Robert Wallace is my next door neighbor in the dorm I call home, and he is both a talented musician and bold-hearted lover of Christ. Find out how he would change the world – and maybe accidentally destroy it – in this week’s Pathos interview.

The Author’s Apprentice: What is your greatest passion? How are you using that?

Robert Wallace: This question plagues me often. At first glance I would say music, but this does not cover it. I really want to use music as a tool to encourage and exhort. Lots of my friends at Moody Bible Institute surpass me in musicality. Though few of them share my same passion to specifically direct it towards uplifting believers and travel extensively while doing it. Adventure paces in my heart. I cannot put it to sleep. So perhaps I will eventually search out the far-forgotten places of this country. If not I’ll settle down with my wife and have 20 children or so – that would be an adventure!

TAA: If everyone in the world gathered around to hear you speak for five minutes, what would you tell them?

RW: They would not understand me. If they did, I would tell them all to jump at the same time – just to see what would happen. On a more serious note, I would exclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ to them!

TAA: If it was up to you to change the world, how would you go about it?

RW: I would help plant a church movement in Chicago that would multiply itself every 2-3 years. I would help plant a church next to every stop on the “L”. After that, I would do the same in every other “Alpha” city in the world. (http://northshorecrossing.org/)

TAA: Who are your heroes? Why do they inspire you?

RW: Systematically I have heroes and then see how flawed they are in some aspect of their character. The greatest example of this is electric bass virtuoso, Victor Wooten; incredible player, amazing talent, horrible spiritual ideas.
However, probably the most continuing “hero” that I have (besides Christ) would be a friend of mine from high school, Nate. He is four years older than me. Seeming to possess all the creative juices the human race has in one body, he taught me a lot about music philosophy and how to be cool in general.

TAA: What is your favorite thing about being a student at Moody? The biggest challenge?

RW: Favorite thing about Moody – the intense classes.
Least favorite thing – the intense classes.

TAA: How can the readers of The Author’s Apprentice pray for you?

RW: Pray that I would learn to manage my time in a God respecting way and that I can encourage those around me.

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Song of the Week: “I’da Called You Woody Joe” by The Gaslight Anthem

Some songs enthrall us because of their artistic and original music, and we love others for their evocative and memorable lyrics.  Then there are the songs that capture our hearts with the inspiring stories behind them, the tributes and the love songs.  “I’da Called You Woody, Joe” is one of those songs.  At first glance, it seems like a bizarre, cryptic tune, upbeat and catchy but nonetheless utterly pointless.  The real depth and beauty of this song, however, comes from its history.  It’s a tribute from Brian Fallon, the lead singer of The Gaslight Anthem, to a man named Joe Strummer, the lead guitarist of a band called The Clash.  Rico, the man mentioned at the beginning of the song, owned a record store when Brian was young.  He bought one of The Clash’s albums for Brian, claiming that the music would change his life.  Rico was right, and Joe Strummer’s work grew into a huge influence on Brian’s own songwriting and even his life in general.  Many, many of the phrases used in “I’da Called You Woody, Joe” are direct quotes from songs by The Clash, and even the title is a reference to how Joe used to call himself Woody because Woody Guthrie left such an impression on him.  To Brian, Joe was his Woody, his inspiration, his hero.

Joe died in 2002, and as he writes in the song, Brian “never got to tell him, so I just wrote it down” as a letter to Joe’s wife, Lucinda, to let her know how much Joe meant to him.  You can practically feel his gratitude and admiration flowing through the notes and the lines of the piece.  When I read this story, I was impressed by the effort that Brian put forth to express his love for his childhood hero.  The end result is pleasant, memorable, nostalgic, and moving, and it made me think: How many of us would go to such great lengths to show someone whom we admire, someone who changed our lives for the better, how much we appreciate them?  How often do we take the men and women who drive us to become more for granted?  And how many times have we sung out to God our love and gratitude for His immeasurably marvelous influence on our lives?  May we take a cue from Brian Fallon and seek to edify the “Woodys” in our lives with a heartfelt, genuine show of appreciation.

Here is the link: I’da Called You Woody, Joe

And here are the lyrics: 

I was crawling around in my head in the haze of a trance.
Rico said, “I’ma turn you onto a sound, cool out your head. This is the sound from Camden town,”

And then I heard it like a shot through my skull to my brain,
I felt my fingertips tingle, and it started to rain,
When the walls of my bedroom were tremblin’ around me,
This ramshackle voice over attack of a bluesbeat,
Tellin’ me, he’s only looking for fun.
And this was the sound, of the very last gang in town.

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I’m doing all right,
Are you doing all right?

And I carried these songs as a comfort wherever I’d go.
They was there when my summers was high,
There when she left me alone.
Saying, “The soul is hard to find.”

And I never got to tell him, so I just wrote it down.
I wrapped a couple chords around it and I let it come out,
When the walls of my bedroom were tremblin’ around me,
This ramshackle voice over attack of a bluesbeat,
And a girl, on the excitement gang.
And this was the sound, of the very last gang in town.

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And are you doing all right?
Are you doing all right?

As heard by my wild young heart,
Like directions on a cold, dark night,
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And I heard it in his chain gang soul.
It wasn’t just the same sad song.
Sayin’, “Let it out, let it out, let it out, you’re doing all right.”
And are you doing all right?

And that was the sound,
I hear the sound,
Do you hear the sound?
I hear the sound,
Of the very last gang in town.


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Song of the Week: “Rescue” by Seabird

This week’s song of the week is a new favorite of mine, a song all about how God is there to lift us out in the darkest of times. He’s our Savior, our hero, and when all of our hope is gone, He is there to be our rescue. Enjoy “Rescue” by Seabird!

“Rescue”

I’m pushing up daisies,
I wish they were roses
I feel like I’m drowning,
but nobody knows it
I’m pushing up daisies,
I wish they were roses
I feel like I’m dying,
just want you to notice

Somehow the grave has captured me
Shown me the man I used to be
Just when I feel my breath is running out…

The earth moves and you find me
Alive but unworthy
Broken and empty, but you don’t care
‘Cause you are my rapture, you are my Savior
When all my hope is gone, I reach for you
You are my rescue

I’m swimming to safety, but even with my best
If I don’t see that rope soon,
this might be my last breath

Don’t let me down
Can you hear me ’cause I am calling out
I’m underground, would you pull me out?

I’m pushing up daisies,
I wish they were roses
I feel like I’m dying,
just want you to notice

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